We CAIR: A Resilience Approach To Improve Health Literacy Among American Indians

Sharing

Seminars
Monday, April 25, 2016

Start Time: 

10:30 AM

End Time: 

12:00 PM

Priscilla R. Sanderson, Ph.D., CRC, Tara Chico, MPH, Alexis McKinley, Tisimpsha Kee, Shalene Yazzie, Dakota Kelly, and Amanda Cassaro

Resilience is storytelling in a culturally-acceptable communication and training mechanism. The Center for American Indian Resilience (CAIR), a partnership between Northern Arizona University, the University of Arizona’s College of Public Health, and Diné College have developed culturally-tailored health literacy student projects. Asset-mapping activity will follow student presentations:

“Mocassin Story: The Birds and the Bees,” will provide accurate medical information about sexual and reproductive health.

 “Nanise’ Bee Iina,”to promote a healthier diet and resilience through healthy eating habits.

 “Mindfulness Health Literacy among American Indian Youth,” to integrate cultural identity to increase persistence and retention rates of American Indian college students.

Learning Outcomes

  • Describe the incorporation of the concept of resilience into a literacy program for American Indians;
  • Identify any myths of STIs and Pregnancy;
  • Provide facts about STIs and Pregnancy;
  • Identify healthier diet and resilience leading to healthy eating habits;
  • Increase knowledge and awareness of mindfulness-based training to college students.

About the Seminar Leaders

Photo: Priscilla Sanderson

Dr. Priscilla Sanderson is a member of the Navajo Nation. Her maternal clan is Hozii Táchii'nii (Old Orabi Red Running Into the Water People), born for Kinyaa'ánii (Towering House), her maternal grandfather's clan is Nakaiidini and paternal grandfather's clan is Bit'ahnii (Leaf).  

Dr. Sanderson has been a member of the Northern Arizona University Health Sciences faculty since 2009. From 2009 to spring 2013 Dr. Sanderson was an assistant professor in two departments: Health Sciences and Applied Indigenous Studies in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, with Health Sciences as her home department.

Dr. Sanderson is a Principal Investigator of the Center for American Indian Resilience (CAIR). The mission of the CAIR is to partner with American Indian communities to promote health and resilience. The CAIR was funded on August 28, 2012, a P20 exploratory center of excellence. The five-year grant was funded for $6.5 million dollars from the National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities. The NIH P20 grant is the first for Northern Arizona University. The CAIR collaborators are the University of Arizona, Mel and Enid College of Public Health and Diné College, a tribal college on the Navajo Reservation. 

Photo: Tara M. Chico

Tara M. Chico, MPH, is a doctor of public health student in Maternal and Child Health at the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health at the University of  Arizona (UA). Since completing the MPH program at the UA, Ms. Chico has worked for the Center for American Indian Resilience (CAIR) in different capacities which include Co-Director of the Community Engagement and Outreach Core.

Alexis McKinley, is an undergraduate student in public health at Northern Arizona University. She is a senior and intern with the Center for American Indian Resilience.

Tisimpsha Kee is an undergraduate student in public health at Northern Arizona University. She is a senior and intern with the Center for American Indian Resilience.

Dakota Kelly, is an undergraduate student at Northern Arizona University. She is a freshman with the Center for American Indian Resilience.

Amanda Cassaro, is an undergraduate student in public health at Northern Arizona University. She is a senior.